Mission Bush Pilot and Nurse

After spending three years in Guyana, South America, we have now moved to Bewani, 50 Km south of Vanimo, Papua New Guinea. We have started a new humanitarian aviation ministry here. In visiting with health officials and church people here, the need for an aviation program to reach into remote villages became very apparent. We are taking health workers and medicines/vaccines, into remote village airstrips and bringing out critically ill patients to the hospital. We also fly in educational materials for schools, as well as take in Bible workers. Toni is helping with the medical end of things, while Gary takes care of the flying part. We have several local lay missionaries we sponsor and we do ground transport for patients as well. We are volunteers here to serve our God and the unreached people of Papua New Guinea. We have a great need for more people to join in this effort.

Monday, December 28, 2015

Happy new year

We had a quiet Xmas. Relaxed a bit and played dominos, not so great with just 2. At least here in the bush there are no firecrackers and fireworks going off all day and night like in town, no money out here.
Working on building small apartment under hanger when not off doing other things. Sunday has to take local church leaders to town for their quarterly meeting as the driver who had promised to take them went the night before. Took me all day.
Today went and asked for another drum of diesel fuel from one of the logging camps. God has given us 8.5 drums this year for free. Value is about $350 each drum! They also gave me hydraulic oil I asked for.
We have been so blessed this past year as the Lord has provided so many good things for us and above and beyond our basic needs. He has been so good to us. May He bless you as well.
Hope you have a good new year filled with blessings from Heaven.
Eagerly awaiting for Heaven, but there is so much work to be done here before the Lord can come and take us home. If only we could find more people with a strong desire for missions and the faith to step out and see God work through them.
Evangelistic camp meeting going this week here in the bush with baptism set for Sabbath. Great way to start off the year. We help with transport and showing DVDs etc and Toni is helping the sick.
Local ambulance isn't here right now so we are on stand by, like last week with the lady we took into hospital with a prolapse.
May you be blessed this new year and drawn closer to Jesus.
Gary n Toni

Monday, December 21, 2015

Wrapping it up

Wrapping it up Dec. 22

It seems a bit hard to believe another year has slipped into history.  We don't get much in the way of world news out here in the bush, but what little we do hear, points to Jesus is coming back soon.  Here in Bewani, one would not know it was Christmas in a couple of days.  Very few here even have calendars and there really is no celebration of the greatest gift ever given to the human race.  In town there is one store that sells a few Christmas items and plays some Christmas music, but that is all we have seen and heard this year.  God gave us His only Son so that we could be restored to Eden, if we choose.

Many things have happened here this year. Getting the paperwork done on the airplane so that we can now fly it, was a big challenge, but was finally accomplished, with the help of many.  The biggest item, though, is that nearly 50 people were baptized this year in our area.  These are the first baptisms here in 8 years!  So much work remains to be done.  There are so many requests for missionaries to share the gospel, but finding workers willing to go, is a problem.

We will be developing the flight program this year, as well as trying to expand the lay missionary program. 

We want to thank those of you who lift us up in prayer to the Throne of Grace.  It is what sustains us.  Thank you to those who have supported the project here with your donations.  God has multiplied them and done many great things.  Thank you for sharing what God has blessed you with.  We pray God will bless you many times over.

We are so grateful for all the blessings our Lord has provided for us this year, we are truly blessed beyond measure!

May this holiday time remind each of us of God's greatest gift and may the New Year be filled with blessings for you.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

Sunday, November 29, 2015

Serving remote areas of the Sepik

Air ambulance, medical work, and missionary work to remote villages in the Sepik region of PNG

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Flying high

Lift off!   Nov 23, 2015

Internet is hard to get and very expensive now, so emails are not going out as often as before.

Thanksgiving holiday arrives this week in the US and people stop to think about what they are thankful for.  We have so many things to be thankful for here in PNG.

Nov. 10 found us in town getting supplies and wondering when we could get the plane moved out to our airbase. The big 55 ft gate where the plane enters the hanger was not yet complete.  When we arrived in town, we were informed that the house and the hanger (that we have been using rent free for the last year and a half), have now been rented, so we had to vacate house and hanger right away.   We packed up what little was left in the house (after being robbed so often, and moving some of it out to our bush house), and got ready to fly the plane to Bewani.  That night, someone came into our fenced, locked yard and broke into our locked car and stole my GPS for the plane, PLB (personal locator device), tools and other items that we really need.  I flew the plane to Bewani (a 16 minute flight vs. 1.5 hours driving) on Nov, 11.  Toni had to wait for our volunteer nurse, Julie, to return from across the border where she was trying to get a new visa.  While waiting, the valve stem on the front tire broke and had to be replaced, and then as they were leaving, a neighbor's dog bit her good on the leg as a parting gift. We all finally arrived in Bewani that evening. The plane looks nice in its new hanger.  There is a picture on our blog site and Face Book.

On Nov. 22, I was able to make 2 medical flights for the first time here in PNG.  I flew in 4 nurses, vaccines, and propane for the cooler and other medical supplies to a remote village. Then on the return trip, I was able to bring out a patient with a bad knee infection they were unable to treat in the bush.  It was great to be doing medical flights again!

On Sabbath, we visited another church for the first time--using 4WD to reach it.  As with so many, we are the first foreign missionaries to ever visit and encourage them.

Julie, our volunteer, leaves Dec 1 and she will be really missed-- not only by us, but also by the health post where she has helped so much.  She has been a real blessing during her stay here and is a true missionary.

We are back opening the clinic in Kilapau again, as the nurse they sent to take over from us a couple of months ago left already.  So we are back one day a week trying to provide some health care to the surrounding villages.  Lots of patients came on Monday, Nov. 23.  There are lots of challenges here on a daily basis, but the blessings God gives us here are more than enough to meet the basic needs.

Last week we had to replace 2 tires on the car, which cost $700.  Today our refrigerator died and they are very expensive here too.

We are thankful for the new church one of our lay missionaries built in a small village and will have the official opening in a couple of weeks along with a baptism. Another lay missionary has people ready for baptism this coming weekend!  We are trying to find more missionaries.  We also still need an airplane mechanic and another pilot would be helpful.  We need missionaries with a passion for missions.

Rainy season seems to be here again along with the heat and humidity.

Toni and Julie plan to make a special meal for Thanksgiving and our thoughts will be with our family and friends so far away.

May God bless each one of you,

Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

 

Sunday, November 22, 2015

Air borne

Our medical aviation program has now taken to the skies over the jungles of PNG!

Thursday, November 12, 2015

She is home now

Two years ago to the day from when we left the U.S. for PNG, our airplane landed for the first time and slept here in Bewani in her new hanger! It has been a long wait, but now it has finally happened! Was a 16 minute flight vs 1.5 hours of hard bouncing in the road if conditions are good. Toni and Julie drove the car up last evening after Julie got back late from the border to get her new visa. Toni had a value stem break off the front tire as she pulled up to the house in Vanimo that we have now moved out of. (We had to move out of our house and plane hanger in town this week after using it rent free for a year and a half!) I"just" happened to call her a couple minutes later from our sat phone to see when she would be leaving. I told her to ask the pastor to help her change it as it is real tough on our land cruiser. He did, she got it repaired, then drove to the border to get Julie, than back to pick up the dog and last items before driving out here. As she was locking  the yard gate for the last time, the neighbors dog rushed out and bit her real bad on the leg. They say they don't have rabies here. She is still sore and hobbling. They arrived here safely a short while after dark. 
So 11-11-15 is another important mile stone for us. Still trying to finish up the gate to front of hanger where plane enters, but getting close.
Tomorrow, Fri, we drive to a pathfinder camp out near town to teach leadership training all day. Then sabbath, attend baptism, present AY in the afternoon out here and Sunday is new church dedication and grand opening that one of our lay missionary built.
Next week I am suppose to do flight orientation with local pilot to find the airstrips. Sure wish I had my GPS that was stolen last week along with other stuff from our car that was locked and in our locked yard in town.
Gary and Toni

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Elephantiasis

Young man with Elephantiasis. A problem out here in the bush along with leprosy and TB.

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Kids cooling off

Going to wash the dishes

Treating the hurting

the vineyard

The Vineyard~ Oct. 28

Many times in the Scriptures, the world is referred to as a vineyard.  Christ spoke of it several times, referring to Himself as the vine and His Father as the vineyard owner.  Christ told about hiring people to work in the vineyard and having trouble finding enough people to go do the work.  It is interesting he didn't tell them just how much He would pay, or pay them before they started--only when the work was done.

It seems that God is still calling people to work in His vineyard (mission field) today. Some of the fields are close by where we live and work.  Some are much farther away.  But God is asking for people to go work!  He promises to supply all our

needs--just like a boss would supply the necessary supplies and tools for an employee to do the assigned task. The boss doesn't pay until the job is done and the day is over.  We go work first, then comes the reward or payment.  Many people don't want to work for God that way though. They don't really believe He will supply what they need, when they need it.  They want to see it all up front first.  Since God, and most bosses don't work that way, they sit back and refuse to go to work.

During the course of our assigned job, God knows what will be needed and when.  He has it all lined up and planned out.  He is never late, surprised or short on supplies.  If He has asked you to do a task in His vineyard, He is responsible for supplying what you need to accomplish it!  He gives each person talents, which will be needed to do the assigned task. If more of us would only trust God and take Him at His word, can you image the amount of work that could be done in a short time to finish spreading the gospel to all the world? 

As we reflect on our time as volunteers, trusting God for everything these last 8 years, God has never shorted us, but has provided more than enough to get the work done.  Sometimes we think things should happen in a different way or order, but the vineyard owner sees the whole picture and always knows what is best.  When we trust Him fully, amazing things happen.

I spent a couple of days in the capital of PNG last week visiting Civil Aviation and other agencies about paper work and re-registering our plane here.  They suggested that since we are humanitarian, private, and our location is so remote from any maintenance operation, that we should request leaving it in US registry and have a mechanic from the US take care of it.  This is the first time someone from Civil Aviation has suggested this to us.  They have always said it has to be changed to PNG before.  We have sent them a formal request, so now we are just waiting to see how God is going to work this all out for His glory!

The pilot who will do my check out has been real sick with malaria and will be out for at least a week yet.

Julie, our volunteer here has been doing mobile clinics in the bush with the local health workers and also helping at the local health post.  On the weekends, she has been helping Toni with Sabbath Schools.  They also have been treating some patients that have come to our home. They both taught a first aid course in town while I was away in the city. The vineyard here has so much need and work to be done to get it ready for the Master's return.

We just had another baptism this last week, bringing the number of new members to over 40 now since December in our district!

This week I was invited to share a DVD on the life of Jesus to a nearby school of about 200 students, they really enjoyed it. Just sharing Jesus!

Thank you so much for your prayers and generous support.

Some new pictures have been posted on our blog site.

 

Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

 

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

Saturday, October 10, 2015

Mobile clinic

Doing mobile clinic, child vaccinations with volunteer, Julie Kretschmar.

Beauty of God's creation

Going to church

Hiking 2 miles to a small church with a large car battery, projector, computer, speakers and felts to share Bible stories and videos with a small church in the jungle.

Four happy boys

Sunday, September 27, 2015

Car wash

Local car wash with our new missionary volunteer

Spider

A spider at the bottom of the stairs to our house. Measured almost 12 inches leg to leg

Fwd: Blog post

Email written by our volunteer nurse, Julie

The morning air is alive with bird song. The mist rises up from the bush floor as a look out my window to welcome a new day. Since we are at the equator, the sun rises and sets at the same time year round, six thirty. The morning air is cool with mist and the dog is stirring on the front porch. About six thirty he lets us know that it is time to take him on his morning walk. Between the birds, frogs, and cicadas there are all sorts of foreign noises to learn here. After the rains, the frogs can be almost deafening, each trying to drown each other out. 

It's Friday, and I have been here in PNG for a week. The difference between the little bush house and where I stayed at PAU is almost night and day. Here it's almost like perpetual camping, though compared to what the people live in, we live richly. It's a simpler way of life out here. No one really plans for the future, and a lot of them don't really have jobs because they don't want to. Even at the Husick (pronounced House-sick, Pidgin for the clinic) there is a very laid back atmosphere. There is no particular privacy, and time is relative. Culture here is vastly different and any other way of life is probably not even considered. The only way to figure out the culture here seems to be to watch and listen. Asking sometimes gets an answer, other times not so much. 

I've helped out two morning at the clinics so far. They have nurses here that do triage, diagnosing, medication dispensing, and really anything that needs to be done. If there is a major emergency then they will take them to the hospital in Vanimo, but everything is pretty much taken care of out here in the bush. There isn't a single doctor to be had so they manage. It's a tough job, and they do the best they can with what the have to work with. The Hausick is a long building built on stilts with four to five rooms. The long porch has a bench where the patients line up in the morning. By the time it opens at around 8:30 there is a cluster of patients on the benches. Usually women with babies who have walked for kilometers already. Babies attached to hips with slings and little children, sometimes dresses, skipping along beside. Almost everyone gets tested for malaria that comes in, since it's one of the biggest problems, medically speaking. No gloves, or hand washing of any type and surprisingly rarely do they touch the patients. A typical routine of care involves the patient coming, placing their health record book on the desk (if they have one) and the nurse taking a brief history as well as looking at their record. The patient describes their problem, sometimes gets weighed, and occasionally gets examined. It's jungle medicine. I have to admire these men and women though, they live out in the bush, talk with people who really don't speak anything other then a tribal language and are pretty much the entire medical staff rolled into one. They treat, dispense meds, do health histories, and occasionally do dressings and wound cleaning. They can just diagnose and treat (who knows if it's right or not because there really isn't any diagnostic testing). But they do the best that they can, and hopefully I can be a positive influence for a little bit of cleanliness. 

I helped in the clinic at Klilipau ( a village about halfway to town) Gary had mission stories going and it overall was a neat experience. I saw some possible leprosy, possible TB, and lots of malaria. The kids here are darling! Most don't really bother with clothes, and skin diseases are rampant. I'm pretty sure they think I'm the funniest thing they have ever seen. They stare and stare until I smile at them, then their little faces break out into great big smiles. I love the people here already and am working on my Pidigin. I don't think I will ever really be able to speak it well, but my understanding is improving each day. Yes, I know I haven't been here long, but I've got to try! 

God is blessing so much. Each and every day I can see God working. It's the most wonderful blessing. The work moves forward here bit by bit. Hopefully we get to fly the plane soon! Gary got permission to fly, so he will be checking out the air strips with an Aussie pilot. I'm excited to do some health care out in the bush.

God is still in control

God is still in control!

First of all let me apologize for our email provider who changed the parameters for mailing bulk emails, and we didn't know it until we realized many of you were no longer receiving our updates.  We didn't just cut you off, the provider did.  We have tried to fix the problem, so hopefully you will be getting this again.  If you don't wish to receive it, then send us a note stating such.  If you missed some, you can go to our blog site and read past updates. www.lewisjungleministries.com and some pictures.

This month we have been operating a clinic one day a week in the village of Kilipau. It is a 30 minute drive from here in Bewani.  The government built the health post 2 years ago, but couldn't find anyone to staff it, so it was never opened, until we opened it about six weeks ago.  We have been averaging over 50 patients per visit. One week, there was a lady with a long gash on her leg from a machete wound. It had happened the day before but she was too far away from medical help. I drove as close as I could to her location and then carried her the last 100 yds. or so to my car. The nurse working with Toni put in the first few stitches, and then Toni put in the rest of them, about a dozen in total.  The next week around 8 pm one evening, we received a message from this same village that a lady was in distress trying to deliver a baby.  We drove down there right away and there was a very young girl hanging onto a corner post under her house, semi squatting with a baby hanging all the way out except for the head.  There were no lights, and there were several ladies standing around her yelling all kinds of orders to her. The head was stuck so we finally got her lying down on her back so Toni could help her get the baby out. After a few minutes of pushing and pulling, and lots of praying that we wouldn't pull the head off, out came the baby. We cleaned the nose and mouth, and stimulated the baby, but were never able to get it to breathe.  We don't know how long the baby had been like that and the cord was not pulsing.  We loaded the baby and mom in the car and raced home to our clinic here in Bewani.  A nurse here spent over an hour sewing her up as she had torn really badly.  At least we were there to help save the mom, (it was her first baby) as she was bleeding a lot.

The nearby public school (to this same village), invited us to come make a health presentation and to show the Jesus video.  Now they want us to come to the school at least once a month.  About 100 attended this first one.  Now another school is asking us to come.  More churches are asking us to come show religious videos to them, also.  More baptisms are also being scheduled in the next few weeks for which we are very grateful.

A volunteer nurse from TN arrived this week for a couple of months and we are happy to have her here.   We have Julie busy already!

This week we are presenting health talks and Bible videos to a camp meeting all

week.

We just received our written permission to start flying the airplane!!! It is a temporary permit while we work on getting the plane registered here.  So I will get a local Australian pilot to check me out on the airstrips I will be using, and then go for it!   It's been a long wait, but in God's time, we are ready to fly!   In the same batch of emails, there was also an email advising us that an anonymous donor had just given a large donation to help get the plane program going.  Perfect timing again!  God is so good!!

Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

Monday, September 14, 2015

Saturday, September 12, 2015

Pressing ahead Sept 7, 2015

So much keeps happening here, that it is hard to keep up sometimes.  Since we last wrote, here are some of the things that have been taking place.

We finally got the health post in the village of Kilipau opened.  It was built by the government about 2 years ago.  They also built a house to go with it.  However, they never found anyone to staff it, so it has sat empty all this time.  There are 16 villages in the area, and this is the only health post except for the one here in our village of Bewani, about 10 miles away.  When you're sick or ready to deliver a baby, it is a long walk, unless you're able to catch a ride on a passing truck.  We have been trying to encourage the government to open it and we even offered to have Toni do it one day a week.  After months of pushing them, they finally agreed to provide a nurse from here and the keys to the clinic.  So we have been going down there one day a week and holding clinic with a local nurse.  We have been averaging about 50 patients each visit. It takes most of the day by the time we load up, travel there (30 min. drive), hold clinic for 7 hrs, and then come home.  Most of the cases are malaria with a wide range of other things like TB, leprosy, colds, pregnancies, etc.  While the patients wait, our lay worker uses a picture roll and tells them Bible stories for over an hour, then I show the Jesus video and the adults are as interested as the kids.   We also had a friend translate a health talk on "cleanliness" that we want to show soon.  It makes the waiting time go faster. Some even stay after they see the nurse.

Another of our lay missionaries finished building a small church in his village and we went for the opening on Sabbath.  The place was full.

Unfortunately, some of our lay workers have given up the calling and our numbers have been reduced.  We are praying more will soon pick up the torch.  We will have to hold another training session soon, I think.  Sometimes the sacrifice is too great or the calling too hard.  Anyway, we are praying for more workers.

We are still working to get permission to begin flights.  Sometimes it feels like we are on a merry-go-round, but it still appears hopeful.

Last week, Toni awoke with lots of itching and stinging in her hands and feet.  Both of her hands, wrist, feet and also her chin were all broken out in pox/blisters. They swelled quickly and started to weep and drain. We were concerned it would spread and become infected. She got some antibiotics and became house bound since we didn't know if it was infectious and we didn't want flies infecting the sores.  It has been almost a week now and most of the pox have dried up with just a few blisters left.  There is no sign of infection yet, which we are so grateful for.

On Sabbath, the fourth baptism was conducted here in the last 9 months!  These are the first ones since 2009.  The harvest is starting.

Thank you so much for your prayers and support as we push forward with the work here in PNG.

We have been able to post a few pictures on FB and on our blog site if you haven't looked there in awhile.  We really enjoy it when you take the time to drop us a note!


 

 

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

skin problems and elephantitas

leprosy is a big problem here. first day opening clinic that serves 16 villages. we are opening it one day a week until we can find someone to do it. 65 patients first day. they said to expect many more this week

Monday, August 10, 2015

Wind beneath my wings

Wind beneath my wings--

Our mechanic, Alberto, from the U.S. arrived on July 31 to do the annual inspection on our plane. The inspection went pretty good, the biggest issue was a lot of the paint had started to blister, so we had to work on that. On Tues., we received and were able to pay the customs bill for the plane so it is now cleared from that. Wed., we finished the inspection and got approval for a 30 minute test flight. That was fun and all checked out well. I finally got to fly the plane for a few minutes here in PNG. Now we are trying to get approval from Civil Aviation authorities in the capitol  to begin my check-out flights and then on to regular flights! 

Many of you may have heard that the pope is calling for a world-wide Sunday day of rest. Well, it has come here to this remote part of PNG already!  Last week, the mayor and Catholic bishop here sent out a letter stating all stores and the market must be closed on Sunday so people could rest and go to church.  The Bible says the seventh-day is the day to rest and worship Him who made Heaven and Earth.

Our lay missionaries are working hard and it is now generating requests from other villages to send them one. So we are trying to find more missionaries willing to go out and share the story of Jesus.

Our work-load here is increasing all the time and now with the airplane about ready to start its flights, we are not sure how we are going to keep up with everything. We need some more workers. We have a young lady (a nurse) coming next month from the US to help for a while and we are grateful for that. We sure would like to have an airplane mechanic come to help keep the plane operating and help with so many other projects.

We could sure use a small group, 4-8 people who would like to do a mission trip and help build a small apartment under our hanger for volunteers to stay.

Thank you so much for your continued prayers and support. The people here are excited and appreciate your help.

Gary and Toni Lewis

 

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

 

Thursday, July 30, 2015

expect the unexpected

July 29, 2015
Mission life in the "land of the unexpected" is just that-- you never know what to expect next. Last week we were asked to transport a body to town to the morgue. They said it was a male-- not from this area. It was late in the evening and stormy, so I asked that we deal with it in the morning if they couldn't find a vehicle to take it, (since the body wasn't going anywhere, it didn't seem to me).
The next morning, I went to the health clinic to see what was happening and there was a body lying on the bench of the porch, where every one sits to wait to be attended. It was wrapped in a mosquito net. It had been lying there all night. The health workers weren't there yet, only patients sitting on the same bench waiting. I went to find the policeman to find out more details, as I couldn't just show up in town with a dead body. He went to check things out, as he had only just heard about it. Turns out, it was not male, but a young woman who had been killed the evening before by lighting. Her husband and 3 young kids were there waiting for a ride to a logging base camp, the opposite direction from town, so they could have a box made for her and then have her taken to her village. I ended up taking her and her family to the base camp.
On Sabbath we went to a small church about ½ hr away to witness a baptism. Our lay missionary there had told us there were 6 ready and the pastor had gone down there a few days before to meet with them. They had fixed a nice area along the river with decorations etc. on Friday. Friday night it rained heavy and washed most of them away, and the water level was up so much that they had to find another spot for the pastor to stand and hope no one was washed down stream. The water was very muddy looking too. 9 people were baptized and we are praising the Lord for them. This was the first baptism conducted in that village in years!
We have nearly completed hanging the nearly 600 ft. of chain link fence around the airplane hanger. We are working on building gates and putting up the barbed wire on top and securing it all to the posts. Hopefully this will help to keep the plane safe.
We were informed last week that the company who has been letting us use their hanger in Vanimo for over a year for free, is negotiating to lease it out to another organization, and also the house we have been using while we are in Vanimo. Hopefully we will be able to fly the plane here to our base before that happens! God's timing is always good.
Our mechanic for the airplane inspection is due to arrive here on Friday so we will be in town working on that, and maybe we will have some internet for a few days!
We are so grateful that Wings of Hope out of St Louis was willing to pay the mechanic's airplane ticket to come here and inspect our plane. What a gift and blessing it is for us. It is always amazing to see God at work in so many ways here.
Toni got to help out with some mobile clinics a couple of days here in the area and learned a bit more about how medicine is practiced here.
Nearly everyday has new surprises. Hopefully our next bulk email will be reporting on the airplanes first flights! Your prayers and support are yielding fruits for the kingdom already.
Friday afternoon, our mechanic for the plane just arrived alone with all his luggage!

River baptism

Kids enjoying bible stories with felts

New fence around hanger

Baptism

It is Sabbath evening here. Today we drove to the village of Kilapau about 1/2 hr away for church. The lay worker there had gotten 6 people ready for baptism. We took the pastor there on Tue to hold some meetings with the church members and the candidates.  The weather today was perfect with very blue skies and a few clouds. No rain until late this afternoon. It has not been very good weather the last few days. Sprinkles on and off and kinda dreary. Kilapau is located next to a good size river which is where they planned to have the baptism. This river can rise several feet with a good rain upstream. It is always muddy looking, like the river Jordon Naaman was told to wash in. Missionary told me they were going to start at 8 am with SS and would I please show the DVD "The final events" by Batchelor since they have had much interest in Daniel and Revelation. We took it and showed it. Then we had church and then the baptism. There were 9 instead to the 6 promised. 50% increase! PTL. It rained there last night and the river was up and moving fast. The site and decorations they had prepared on Friday, were washed away.the water is very muddy and you can't see into it. They tested where it would be safe to conduct the baptism. The missionary stood very close to the pastor in case things went bad. The last candidate was an adult cripple who has shriveled legs and is wheel chair bound. 4 men picked him up and carried him out into the fast moving water to where the pastor stood. Then they lowered him into the water to be baptized! It was really neat to see it happen! 9 more for the kingdom if they remain faithful! We have been giving each person baptized a new bible. This is the first baptism conducted in this village for years. There has been a small SDA church there for nearly 40 years, but not much growth. Today membership climbed from 33 to 42. They have to have about 50 to become an organized church. I challenged them to strive for that number by the end of this year! We will see. The harvest has begun. This is the third baptism now in this district in the last 7 months! There had been none since 2007. We are trying very hard to get people here excited to have baptisms and to become missionaries. 29 baptized so far! Your prayers and support are making a difference for the Kingdom! 


Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Lay Missionaries

Lay Workers!  June 16

When we left for our visit to the USA, we had placed 8 lay workers out in villages to begin the work of sharing the gospel and providing very basic medical help to these villages. We had trained over 30 with the assistance of the pastor, but ran out of time to get more out into villages.  Upon our return, we started visiting these laymen and some came to visit us. We soon found out that several of our trainees had gone and started on their own without waiting for us to return.  They didn't know if we would have sponsors for them or not, but they wanted to start their mission work. What a happy surprise that was for us!  We now have 12 out and counting!  We never expected it to take off so fast.  Many more people being reached then we could ever do ourselves. When the Spirit of the Lord moves on people's hearts, things happen.  The reports they are bringing back are very encouraging and emphasizing the need for more missionaries and funds.  Several have reported that villages near where they are working are requesting that they come to their villages to teach them also, or send another missionary. One has already started to build a church and others are making plans to build one, since some villages have already offered them land.  One reported how a young lady was very sick and had asked her religious leaders to come pray for her with their idols and she only got worse. Then she asked our missionary to pray for her and 2 days later she was well. Nearly all of the missionaries are reporting that their own personal spiritual growth has grown since starting out on their mission.

As you might guess, we have need for a few more sponsors for these missionaries. It costs $120/month USD. Many are requesting help to purchase materials for building a small missionary house and to start building churches.

This whole endeavor is growing much faster than we ever expected. It is exciting to visit with these missionaries and hear their reports and see the enthusiasm.

We are still working on getting the plane in the air. We have a mechanic coming next month from Arizona to do the annual inspection on it, so we are praying that when that is done, the paper work will be also, so we can start that important phase of our work here, as well

Thank you so much for your continued prayers and support,

 

Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

 

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project, if for lay workers, note: PNG lay workers

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

News update, we just received our tax id number, another step in getting the plane released!!!

 

Sunday, May 24, 2015

We have returned.

Dear Friends and Loved Ones,  May 22, 2015

We have returned to our mission base in Bewani, Papua New Guinea. We had a great time visiting in the USA with family and friends and enjoyed lots of good food. We were blessed by so many through your gifts and donations. Thank you so much. So many of you prayed with us and for us and that is what helps us to continue on. Through Christ, all things are possible.

The airstrip here was overgrown as we expected, but we have given it a "haircut" already and after a couple more, it should be back into shape. The guy who stayed at our house while we were gone did a good job and our things here are fine.

When we arrived, our pilot friend who flew our plan here from Guam, was here to meet us along with his family. They are returning to the US after working as a pilot in the highlands for a few months.  It was nice to see them again and spend some time with them here in this part of the country.

Now that our NGO papers are finally finished, thanks to two wonderful ladies in the capitol while we were in the States; we are able to proceed onto the next phase of paperwork to get the plane approved to fly.  We also need an inspection on the plane now, since it has been sitting for a year.  We are looking to see whom God will provide to do this important task.

The people here are really happy that we have returned, some had doubted that we would come back, but now are happy that we are here again.

We have visited with some of the lay missionaries briefly already and the reports are encouraging. We are planning to go out and visit them in their villages in the next few days and weeks. 

There is so much work to do, we are praying more help will come soon.

Once again, a special thank you to all who were so generous to us during our brief visit, may God bless you richly. We wish we could have visited with more of you, but time just went too fast. Maybe during the next visit, we can go to some of places we were unable to make it to this time.

Thank you again for your prayers and support,

Gary and Toni

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

Thursday, May 7, 2015

Fwd: Returning to PNG


Our time here in the USA has gone by so fast. In just a couple of days we will be flying back to PNG. We have been so blessed during our visit! So many have given generously of their food, housing, time, funds and gifts to take back with us! Thank you so much for being a part of this mission project. May God bless you richly. 
Gary was able to get his pilot license current again, thanks to coordination of a pilot friend in Nebraska and a donor in Iowa who provided use of his plane, his instructor and a place to stay! 
We have made many new friends when at different speaking appointments and renewed old friendships. What a joy it has been! We wish we could have seen those of you living in other parts that we were not able to visit this time. Just think how fun it will be in Heaven sharing stories of God's mercies and blessings, and we won't be under a time schedule. We long for the day when our Savior will return and take us to a better land.
We are in need of more workers, so if you are interested in coming to PNG, let us know.
Blessings to each of you,
Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations 
If you would like to receive MPI's newsletter, send a request to  adamsamigos@gmail.com  

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

USA travel/speaking appointments

Hi Friends,
We are enjoying our short visit to the US and spending time with family and friends. The time seems to be going very fast. We plan to return to PNG in a month. 
We spent our last weekend in PNG at the capital, Port Moresby. During that short visit God sent us two ladies to help us. They were able to finally get our association registered (NGO) with the government and they also got our work permit completed and are getting our new visa ready at the moment. It was a series of Divine interventions that led us to these helpful ladies Saturday night and again Sunday morning. What a blessing they have been and we look forward to more opportunities working with them. After working on the NGO for almost a year, they finished it up in about a week. 
When we arrived in Utah, there was a big box waiting for us. In it were new headsets to replace the ones we had stolen in PNG!  What a blessing. When God opens the windows of heaven, out come the blessings! They were sent by a lady from Washington.
Here is a list of our current speaking engagements and we would love to see as many of you as possible. 
April 11, Provo SDA church
April 14-16 flight training Lincoln NE
April 18, Geenville, TN
May 2, Hendersonville, NC
May 9, Central Church Phoenix, AZ
May 10, depart for PNG
If you would like to talk to us, email us for our Stateside phone number.
Thank you so much for your prayers and support. It has been so refreshing to visit with those we have been fortunate to see so far. Hope to see many more of you before we leave.

Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: "PNG project"

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

Friday, March 20, 2015

34 complete training course

Greetings family and friends,

 

We held two training sessions at different locations so that we could make it available to more people.  We had 34 students complete the entire course that we taught with the pastor.  Several others attended, but were not able to be there for all the classes, but may finish when we offer it again.  We gave them training on health principles, basic first aid, water treatment, sharing the gospel by telling Bible stories etc, and how to do visitations.

In the couple of weeks after we completed the courses, before we left for the USA, we were able to get 9 of these lay missionaries out to remote villages.  One has reported that he had to stop at a village, on his way to his assigned one, while he was waiting for a boat.  He shared with the people what he was doing and they wanted to hear the gospel.  They have offered him ground for a church if he will stay. People are thirsty for the gospel.   Another missionary has been doing lots of first aid work, as there are no health workers in the area.   He used up his supplies in 2 weeks

We received the sad news that one of our lay missionaries in Guyana, Garnett Gomez, was murdered last month during a robbery. He leaves a wife and 2 small girls. He is the third missionary friend serving in the field that we have lost in the past year. Please come quickly Lord Jesus

We went to a small school near our airbase where there are 25+ kids in the first couple of grades.  They have only six small desks with attached chairs, but no other chairs. The floor is dirt. We gave them a felt set to teach Bible stories to the kids. They were super excited to get the flannel board and felts.

We still have medevacs.   We have taken young people to the hospital who were very sick.  We are thankful that they have all recovered.

We left on furlough to Port Moresby on Mon., March 16, at 6 am.  We flew to Australia and changed planes, then landed in Los Angeles on Mon. at 6 am.  Two different places at the same time!

We are great full for a safe trip home, although we are tired.   It takes a while to get accustomed to the 17- hour time difference!

We hope to see as many of you a possible while we are visiting here in the US.  We will be in Provo, Utah the first part of April, then North Carolina last of April. We will be driving lots.

Thank you for your continued prayers and support. God is answering and good things are happening.

 

Gary and Toni Lewis

 

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: "PNG project" if donating for our lay workers, note "PNG layworkers"

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

 

Saturday, February 21, 2015


Part of our pineapple patch and taking a 13 yr boy semi-comatose to hospital in town


Fwd: Volunteer lay missionaries




We have now completed our first training course of lay missionaries with the local pastor.  We had 14 complete the course and several others attend part of it.  Some of them will finish what they missed when we do our second one in another week.  It will be at a location about an hours drive from here.
This week we placed 2 of the missionaries out to their villages. One is a widow with an 8 yr old son. She will be working in 2 villages located near each other. They are about 1.5 hour hike from the nearest road. I helped carry her belongings about half way as that was all the time at had that day, and we hiked through jungle and swamp. They went bare foot and I was grateful for shoes. They have very tough feet here. The other missionary along with his wife are further away.  I drove almost 4 hrs (60mi) to where we were able to put them on a dugout canoe that would take about another day to reach their village.  If the road had not been so muddy, I could have  driven all the way, but even in 4 wheel drive and a high undercarriage, we didn't think we could make it. When we have the plane flying, I should be able to fly there in about 30-40min as they have an airstrip there.
Both of these missionaries are on fire for the Lord, and are excited to begin work in a village where they don't know the gospel of Jesus.  We sent picture rolls and first aid kits and some food staples with each.  They also get a small stipend given by sponsors.  $120/ mo.
We are still called upon to do emergency medical evacuations with our car, taking people to the hospital.  One last week was a 13 yr-old semi-comatose boy with severe abdominal pains, the other this week was a young lady who had a fight with her husband and supposedly drank some bleach.
One of the missionaries we sent out a couple of weeks ago, I saw along the road this week and he told me has been treating so many people in his area that most of his first aid supplies are all used up.  These kits are very basic as is their training we gave, but already they are using them to help many people. I promised to try to get some more supplies to him as soon as we can.
Paper work takes so long to get pushed through here.  Our new NGO is supposed to be about done, which will then let us apply for our visa renewal and take care of customs on the airplane.  It is amazing how long it can take to get some things done.
Diesel is about $8/gal here now. With all the driving we have been doing lately, we really appreciate the drums of fuel the logging companies here have so kindly donated.  God keeps finding ways to supply our needs.  Driving along the roads here people are always wanting rides.  Rides here by local pickups are very expensive.  They know we don't charge.  We don't stop too often, as when we do, they come out of the bush in large numbers and try to all crowd in which then causes a fight when we don't let them all in.  We have to be careful where we stop and for whom we stop.  Sometimes they will flag us down just to give us some food from their garden, or give us some for giving them a ride.
Toni is still trying to teach the different churches and groups how to use the felts to tell Bible stories.  The kids and adults love it, they are just a bit afraid to use it themselves, plus it means planing ahead and that is hard for them to do here.
We have moved what few items were left in our house in town (Vanimo) out after being robbed the second time by the same people. So now if we have to stay overnight or make a trip in the middle of the night with a patient we will have to take a small suitcase with clothes, towels, bedding and food. We are trying to just do more day runs of going and returning the same day.  Makes a longer day, but.... Wish we had another missionary to be there all the time and also help with the project.
Looking forward to our upcoming visit to the USA. not sure on dates yet until we know when our visa will be done, or if we have to leave the country in order to get it done.  Not much is easy and straight forward here, and every time we ask a question, we get a different answer!
Thank you so much for you prayers and support.  God is working hard and the evil one is working hard to stop all he can. Thankfully, we know Who is stronger and we are on His side.
Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

Thursday, February 12, 2015

updated photo of finished airplane hanger waiting for our plane to arrive


Wednesday, January 28, 2015

little church in the bush

Little Church in the Bush!

 

Life in a foreign country is not always just filled with exciting adventures, neat places to visit, and exciting stories to share.  More often, it is filled with hard work, sweat and tears, heartache and disappointments. Then, of course, is the obvious pain of missing family, friends and those things we are accustomed to. We have learned that when the negatives seem to pile up, and the pile gets pretty high, that God comes along and showers some extra blessings to remind us we are not forgotten and that we are where He wants us to be at this time.

A couple of weeks ago, things were going kind of rough. We went to town to get supplies and continue to push paper work for the airplane.  When we arrived at our house in Vanimo, we discovered it had been broken into and robbed.  The cleaning lady who takes care of the other side of the duplex came out and confirmed and said that the other side had been really cleaned out. The police and property owners had already been there to investigate.  We have been robbed before, but this is the first time here, and it is never easy, trying to figure out what was taken and you feel so violated.

The thieves took food from the fridge and freezer, clothes, pots and pans, cords for charging electronic items, cameras, flashlights, all four headsets for airplane that we need in order to talk and listen on the radio (those were the expensive items that can't be replaced here) and some tools. We had some cash hidden that we use when in town, which they didn't find and we are grateful for that.  It could have been much worse. 

Then later on the same day, we got another setback in our work, trying to get equipment to maintain the airstrip here.  Things just weren't going too well in our favor. Packages we had hoped would arrive, were not being delivered by the airlines even though the PO and customs were cleared. Then came the Sabbath.

We drove to a little church (Kilipau) we have seen along the road to town. It is a small church built out of native material (thatch). I had told the layperson in charge a few weeks ago that we planned to visit on this Sabbath.  When we arrived that morning, you should have seen how their faces lit up, they couldn't make their smiles any bigger.  The little church was full, and there was just enough room on a board bench for us to sit on.  They gave us a very emotional welcome.  They said the church was started in 1986 and we were the first white people to ever visit and no one from the mission or district had ever come before, either.  They were just overjoyed that we would come to visit.  Toni had Sabbath School for all the kids, babies through youth, with her felts and songs and then the quizzes. They loved her and the program.  Meanwhile I taught the adults and then did the church service. The reports they gave said membership is over 60, and that tithes and all offerings totaled less than $20 USD per week. It is a very poor church, like most of the rest of them we have visited, they have no health post there, and there were a lot of health problems among the members. After church they told us, we want to give you a gift, please wait a few minutes while we go get it.  While some left to do that, I told stories from Guyana of God's faithfulness. They sent us home that day with 18 pineapple and some bananas. God says He will open the windows of Heaven!  We gave some away later and canned some and ate a lot. Then they asked us to help them with medical help--sure glad Toni is a nurse. The needs here are so many and so great, but so few who will do the work.

There are still some of our new DVD's available if you didn't get one yet. You can share them at your church or Bible study group as a mission story, if you like. If you would like one, email Diane Degeraty for your free copy. dwdegeraty@yahoo.com She lives in Arizona and has agreed to mail them out for us.

We are planning to be in the States for a visit in April and May.  We don't know the exact dates yet, due to needing to renew our visa here first.  We don't know exactly where all we will get to visit yet, but would like to see as many of you as possible. We would be happy to share at your church or Bible study group if you would like. We expect to arrive in Phoenix AZ, will visit UT, and most likely take, a trip East to NC, etc. If you're interested, let us know.

Blessings to each of you

Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

 

Monday, January 5, 2015





sea life, butterflies and moths here in PNG




first baptism in Bewani area in years, church service in Sumumini, SS for kids, and Adventist pioneer from 50 years ago and current church leader