Mission Bush Pilot and Nurse

After spending three years in Guyana, South America, we have now moved to Bewani, 50 Km south of Vanimo, Papua New Guinea. We have started a new humanitarian aviation ministry here. In visiting with health officials and church people here, the need for an aviation program to reach into remote villages became very apparent. We are taking health workers and medicines/vaccines, into remote village airstrips and bringing out critically ill patients to the hospital. We also fly in educational materials for schools, as well as take in Bible workers. Toni is helping with the medical end of things, while Gary takes care of the flying part. We have several local lay missionaries we sponsor and we do ground transport for patients as well. We are volunteers here to serve our God and the unreached people of Papua New Guinea. We have a great need for more people to join in this effort.

Monday, December 10, 2018

Stuck in the Mud!

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Dear friend,
 

A sabbath to remember!

Seldom do we have a sabbath that one might consider to be routine.

This last sabbath is one that was extra special.  We went out to visit a village— over four hours drive from our home—not actually so many miles as the roads don't allow for fast travel. The last three attempts we have made to visit this village and little church have ended in failure due to the roads being impassable.  We were determined to make it this time, as we were told there was a new "improved" road. They had people requesting baptism so we took the retired pastor with us to take care of that aspect.  We loaded up several large bags with used clothes, a box of Bibles, felts and lesson papers for children's lessons, and lots of talking Bibles (Godpods)—since many out there are illiterate. We left home at 6 a.m. with high hopes and lots of prayer— especially since we had failed the last three times and our car is getting old and tires are worn a bit.  We reached  the "new" road after three hours to the village of Amanab where we were headed. It had rained the night before and there was some light rain as we traveled. The mud was slippery and there were several areas that we barely made it through in 4WD— giving it all we had.  After an hour on this "new road", we got stuck cross-wise going up an incline in deep muddy ruts. I tried everything i could, but no go. People we had just passed said we were about a mile away from the village.  So we decided we would walk the rest of the way, do the baptism and then have the members return with us to help get the car out and haul our gifts to them back to the church.  Just after we started walking, it started to rain, and rain some more. We finally arrived at Amanab after two hours of hiking (5-6 miles) up and down the hills through the rain and the mud— dripping wet.

We were too late for the baptism, because another pastor had gone up with a group earlier in the week and he did it since they figured we weren't going to make it with all the rain.  So we visited with them for about an hour and shared a nice piece of orange watermelon with them. They found several young people to hike back with us to try to get the car unstuck.  There were no vehicles in the village to come give us a pull.  So we hiked the two hours back in the pouring rain.

I had been asking God to keep the rain off the road that we needed to return on, because it was already muddy. When we got to the car, it had not rained there since we left it nor on the road back home!  On the part of the road that we hiked on, it rained a lot. I could see that without another vehicle to help pull it out,  was basically impossible to get our car out. I gathered the group of guys around and told them how angels had helped to lift our 20' container onto a truck at the wharf and that we would need them now to help push the car out.  So we prayed, then we dug out some of the mud, we cut branches to put under the tires and attached a long strap to pull with.  Then some pulled and some pushed. I had the car running, but when I let the clutch out it just smoked and the tires didn't turn, so there was no help from the car.  We dug some more and Toni and I were praying the whole time.  We tried again and now we knew the clutch was probably burned up.  Everyone pulled or pushed hard, and I engaged the clutch, and suddenly the car stated to move, it got lined up so I could back it down the slope and the wheels started to move and I backed it down on its own power.  The angels of God had given the extra push to move it after we had done all we could humanly do.  Then he fixed the clutch and we had no more trouble with it all the way home!  God helps us do what we can't, when we have done all we can!  Don't sit back and wait for Him to act, go to work and then He will help you!  We have experienced this many times.  The guys carried the bags and boxes the two hours back to the village and we drove the four hours home.  The fourteen hour day was a bit long and very tiring, but it was so rewarding to see the hand of God working on our behalf. There were three miracles in one day that we could see with our own eyes!

A week ago Toni suddenly developed a rash and welts on her body that kept moving around. They would pop up in one place and a few hours later, some other place.  There was no fever or other symptoms, just a scary, burning, itchy rash.  After two days of this misery, God healed her. We have no idea what it was or where it came from.

We want to wish each of you a very special Christmas. May it turn our hearts to the first advent of our Savior.  Here in the bush one wouldn't know it was Christmas except for the fire crackers and fireworks that they shoot from Christmas to New Years.  That is all we see and hear here.  

We love it when you send us your notes of encouragement, it really brightens our days here.

Blessings,

Gary and Toni Lewis


 
Copyright © 2018 Wings of Hope PNG, All rights reserved.

Our web site:  www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:
Mission Projects Inc.
P.O. Box 504
College Place, WA 99324
Please include a note:  PNG Project

Or go to www.missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations
 
Our address in PNG is:
Wings of Hope PNG · PO Box 203 · Vanimo 551, West Sepik Province 551 · Papua New Guinea

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Saturday, December 1, 2018

Under our house after heavy rain. Good news is it leaves fast too. Pineapple patch in the back.
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Checking for live and fleas
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Monday, November 19, 2018

Thankful for the Blessings!

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Dear friend,

Toni had a nice trip to the US. It was a short one and she was on the go all the time — but she at least got to see immediate family and some friends.  She got a lot of much needed computer help and now we are on a steep learning curve trying to practice and figure out the new things. Being gone from the US so long, has left us very out of date.  She also went to have a tooth checked and found out that she needed several procedures done and in short order. Thanks to kind dentists in Utah, she saw three dentists in three days and got everything fixed up! 

We still haul patients to the hospital in town and help with vaccination clinics as needed. Right now there is an outbreak of Polio in the country so the nurses have been going to all the villages vaccinating everyone 15 and under.  When I go with them to provide transportation, I show the kids and adults the video of Jesus and health videos—all in local language of Pidgin English (Tok Pisin).  It provides incentive to hurry up and get vaccinated so they can come watch the video.  There is no TV, radio, internet or video games to compete with, so I get a crowd real fast, of old and young alike!
We have been here 5 years already living in the bush. We truly believed that someone would have been willing to come and take over this project who is a bit younger, but so far, no one has been willing.

We want to once again thank each of you who have prayed and supported this project so that it has been able to go forward.  Last week our new ministers completed a five week training course for lay missionaries, and twenty-one completed it.  We helped where we could, and are so happy to see them complete this important training. Now the hard part is to get them all to go out and become missionaries for Jesus!

This month 13 were baptized and 40 more requested to get ready for baptism!
We are trying out a new program for sending out our newsletters.  Would like to know what you think of it.

Happy Thanksgiving to those of you in the USA.

May God continue to bless you,

Gary & Toni Lewis
Copyright © 2018 Wings of Hope PNG, All rights reserved.

Our web site:  www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:
Mission Projects Inc.
P.O. Box 504
College Place, WA 99324
Please include a note:  PNG Project

Or go to www.missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations
 
Our address in PNG is:
Wings of Hope PNG · PO Box 203 · Vanimo 551, West Sepik Province 551 · Papua New Guinea

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graduates from laymen training school

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Mumu oven, using hot stones buried in the ground

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Kids watching Jesus video after vaccination

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Monday, October 22, 2018

life in the bush

FRIDAY

The trip home after a medivac was something else. I had two empty drums in the back— hoping to sell them. About a 1/3 of the way home it started to rain and I stopped to check barrels to make sure the rough road wasn't going to make them break the window again. When I started up, there was a growling noise and drag to the left. I got out again— in the rain— to see if I had flat. No I didn't—and I didn't see any problem. I tried to go again and it was worse. I got out again and discovered that  one of the two bolts that holds the brake assembly on the front wheel was gone and the assembly was dragging against the rim. This is Friday @12:30 pm and it is raining, and a long ways from no where! I backed the car up a couple of feet and the brake realigned enough so it didn't rub on the rim. After lots of praying, I went forward slowly and it stayed aligned. I couldn't use the brakes, since that would make it lock up again. So I drove home in the rain, with no brakes, slowly up and down the mountains. I was glad to have a manual transmission. I was so thankful to get both the car  and myself home safely, I had to use the hand brake once to slow down a bit. It was a slow muddy, wet drive home.  I don't have a bolt to replace the lost one, so will look at my options on Sunday. I hiked to Somboi to inform the pastor that I can't take him to his preaching engagement tomorrow. I don't have the  ATV available, because Toni has the only key with her, to get a copy made. 

Such is life in the bush. Dinner was a bit late, but that is common here. 

SUNDAY

Today my helper offered to hike to the logging base camp about 16 miles away to see if they had a bolt that would fix the problem on the car. He was able to get a ride most of the way going and returning. God answered that prayer and he was also able to get two bolts the size I needed. Now I have a spare! God has so many ways to provide! They are used bolts, but there was no charge! Yesterday, I just walked to the closest church on Sabbath, just over a mile away, since I didn't feel like walking to the church I had planned to attend, about 12 miles away.

There have been lots of drunks roaming around and it was very noisy last night and today, and I can still hear yelling tonight. The moon is out and it is always worse when it is bright at night!

One of my missionaries brought me 5 ears of corn today and peanuts! She said she will have more peanuts later this week for me. Our retired pastor gave me a nice pineapple, and last sabbath they gave me one at church too! God is so good!

MONDAY

I brought a lady to the hospital in town this morning. It is her 4th pregnancy, and she is having twins—one is transverse. She is in labor so they wanted her in town in case she needs C-section. Days seldom go as we plan. There are always surprises! God helped me to get car repaired yesterday—just in time for this medivac! That was at 8:00 am. At 8:00 pm they came back to my house with another lady in labor needing to go to Hospital in town as they said she had an inverted uterus.  I got home a little before midnight. Just a glimpse in to life in the bush.

 I hope you have a wonderful week. 

Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations 

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Counting the cost

Counting the cost…

What is the cost of missions? What is the price tag for winning a soul to the Kingdom of God? How much is enough; how much is too much to reach the lost? How much are you and I willing to give to see someone in Heaven?

When you really stop to think about these questions, what do you come up with? God gave up everything to make the way possible for us to be redeemed. He gave up more than we can even begin to imagine. Why then do we complain when we give so little to reach the unreached?

Just before we came to PNG, a young family sold everything to become volunteer missionaries to a remote tribe here in PNG.  Not too many months after they arrived, he was killed in a freak accident. They hadn't even received their shipment of goods and personal items yet. The widow and 2 daughters had to return to the States with nothing.  What a price they paid, and are still paying, to try to bring the good news of salvation to an unreached tribe.  Did God ask too much? I think often of our friends and fellow pilot who were volunteers in Venezuela, where they had given all up for reaching the unreached in the bush. Their plane went down doing a medical evacuation and has never been found. Was the price too high; was it worth it? So many others have given their all for the gospel. The Bible tells of many who did the same thing thousands of years ago.  History records many through the ages who have paid a very high price, and sometimes we wonder what was gained by it all.

God has been merciful to us and spared our lives thus far.  For some reason, He has seen fit to end the use of our little plane here in PNG. I only made about 160 flights with it here. Those flights included medical evacuations for those needing urgent medical care, flying vaccines and medicines out to remote villages, and taking missionaries and pastors out to unreached villages to share the good news of Jesus. Many of you have donated a lot of money to get the plane ready to come, then to get it here and then to help with the maintenance and repairs while here. A lot of money has been spent for only a few hours of flight. If one of those flights had resulted in you getting the medical care you needed to spare your life, would it have been worth it? What if one of those flights brought in the vaccines needed to spare your village and family from a deadly outbreak, would it be worth it? What if one flight was the one that brought you the good news of Jesus and lead you to being saved in God's kingdom, would the cost be too great?

We are very sad that due to things out of our control, the plane is now being shipped back to the USA.  The mechanic who has the PNG license to work on it, sign it off and agreed to do continued maintenance on if for us, is returning permanently to the US. That leaves no one to sign it off or provide for future maintenance at this time. The shop where is was being worked on, doesn't really want it taking up space when there is no one to finish repairs. As far as we know, he is the only mechanic and this is the only shop in the country certified to work on our Cessna 182 that is available to us. So we were left with the option of just walking away from it and leaving them with the parts they don't want, or of shipping it and getting it flying again once back in the US. Maybe God has a work for it to do there now, or maybe in another field somewhere else.  We don't know the answer to that yet.  This has not been easy for us, but since when has mission work been easy?  

We do know that God has not forgotten or forsaken us! His promises are true!  Apparently the work is completed for our plane here, even though we see a great need for it— through our poor human eyesight.  God knows best and we are trusting Him to work it all out for His glory.  

Thank you so much for all you have done and given to make these few flights possible, only Heaven will tell us the results of this investment, and we will say, It was good enough!

This raises lots of questions and we have been struggling with many of them the last few weeks, as this has all taken place since our last newsletter. We don't have many answers yet, but are taking it one day at a time and trying to build our faith and trust that God will work all things out for the best.

Toni will be visiting family the month of October, I will stay back and help establish our new lay missionaries and keep doing the myriad of things that keep us busy all the time.

Thank you for your continued prayers and support.  They really mean a lot to us.

Blessings, 

Gary and Toni

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations


Wednesday, September 19, 2018

More insect traps

Insect trap, plant eats insects

Monday, September 3, 2018

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Sunday, August 26, 2018

2 baptized this sabbath in the ocean

2 baptized this Sabbath

Baptism in the Ocean

Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Good news

Some good News!

For over a year, we have been trying to get a new three year visa and work permit so we can go home and return to PNG, legally.  Our old ones expired in January of this year, which has made it so we can't leave the country, let alone return. We have been receiving excuses and delays for months.  Finally a couple of weeks ago, we decided it was time to go in person to the capitol and the agency office and see if that would help, since  emails and phone calls didn't seem to be doing the job. The main lady who operates the agency has been sick for a couple of months and finally turned our case over to an assistant. We met with him and got more delays, then he up and left for a new job in another city. We were in town staying in a motel and they are not cheap in this country. After the third day the lady's sister contacted us and said she would go to immigration and try to sort it out. We met her there and they said we had to pay a large fine because we overstayed our visa. We showed how we had filled out all the paperwork on time and the agent had assured us all was filed. They had no record of it in their system, so we had to pay.  She promised it that afternoon. Well that turned into a week. Finally, the sister was able to get them, and that night her sister, the one who owned the agency died.  Our friend was able to pick up our passports from her though, before things got delayed again!  Now we are just trying to get our friend to send our passports to Vanimo so we can have them!  It was God's timing that we went when we did.

Last week in the village of Oriu we had a baptism of four people.There are no Christians in this village and these are the first to be baptized!  Our lay workers have been working hard there and finally we have a harvest!  Many more have now expressed their desire to prepare for baptism also!  To get to this village we drove an hour, hiked 20 minutes along a steep river bank in the bush and then waded across the river (up to mid-thigh).  As the baptism and program were finishing, it got windy, we heard thunder, and saw dark clouds.  I asked God to please hold the rain back and the river that was sure to rise until we were done and back on the main road.  We barely reached the road when the heavens opened and dumped the rain.  The river rose very fast where we had just had the baptism and waded across.  On the road home trees were being blown down across the road.  Angels went before and we arrived home safely after removing a tree by towing it with the car!

When we purchased our airplane engine, we had to make a large deposit so that we would send the old engine back to the factory.  After many months, the cancelled check just arrived!  We praise God for that!

The next 3 Sabbaths we have baptisms scheduled in different villages and more are lining up to get put on the schedule.  It is rewarding to see people beginning to realize time on this old earth is running out and we need to get right with God!

It is also rewarding to see how God continues to provide the food we need, good health and the funds to keep going.  Sometimes we wonder how we will pay all the bills, but God seems to find a way.

Thank you so much for your prayers and financial support.  We are doing the best we can and God is blessing in many ways.

Gary and Toni Lewis

New pictures posted on our blog belowwww.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations


Sunday, August 19, 2018

Deer who came to church and baptism

4 baptized in village where there are no Christians!

Fierce guys we met

Toni has been captured

The mudmen of the highlands

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Fighting hard

Ground hard fought 4!

Greetings from the jungles of PNG—a place where the unexpected is the norm and nothing is easy to accomplish.  The devil doesn't want to give up ground that he has long claimed as his.  He has been fighting us each step of the way.  The last 18 months we have experienced many set backs. Some are so big you wonder where it was you started from. We have been praying hard for the Lord to intervene and turn things around for His glory.  It's kinda like the story of Job in the Bible—he didn't understand what was going on, either.  God sees a bigger picture than we do, so we just have to have faith that He is still in control and will work things out in His time and way.  

This year we have two new young ministers working here in the bush with us. They are making a positive difference.  We also have a new pastoral director for the district and it appears things are turning around for the good.  In the month of June, we had more baptisms in the district than in all of 2017!  Many more are now getting ready, so the tide seems to be turning back, finally.  

Last week we received two new missionaries that our sponsors are supporting. They both competed the seminary, but the missions here couldn't afford to hire them, so we did!  So we now will have four ministers working here in the bush to reach new areas and strengthen the existing members.  We are excited to have them all here and they come with a sincere desire to serve the Lord.

The mechanics in the States haven't been able to locate a part that we need for the plane, so the work on the plane cannot continue until we get it.  If they have to have it special made, it will cost about $1000.00. 

The car has taken a beating over the last 4 1/2 years driving over our rough roads. It was well used when we got it.  It is the oldest car of its kind that I have seen still running in these parts.  It is showing its wear, and many parts are being replaced and many more need to be. Just this past weekend, it was left on the road 10 miles from home for 3 days.  It was due to a bad wheel bearing, but angels watched over it, and help came with parts (amazing), to get it fixed.  So Gods missionary car is home again!

Everything seems such a struggle here, but that paves the way for God to show His helping hand.  Our ATV has proved to be a blessing, even though I didn't want to bring it here.  When the car is broken down, at least I have some way to go chase parts or meet appointments.  It is not much fun driving it 60 miles in the rain though, and I only have a cold shower waiting when I get home.  At least there was a shower and a dry towel!

I made desks with benches attached for 65 students in the K-2 classroom, at no cost to them. They have been sitting on the floor up until now.  We have been working with various youth groups like Pathfinders and Adventurers. So we are keeping plenty busy.

God blesses us in so many ways.  Your prayers and support DO make a difference as they become tools in God's hand to help us. Thank you so much!  Please continue to pray for us, for the project and for someone to come and take this project over, so we can let someone younger keep it going.  There still isn't any progress on getting our visas renewed so we can visit home again.  Please remember this in your prayers. We really appreciate it when you take a few minutes to drop us a note!

Blessings to each of you,

Gary and Toni Lewis  

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations


Wednesday, July 4, 2018

22 desk-chairs made and delivered

These desk-chairs were made for local k-2 classroom that has over 60 students with nothing but the floor to sit on or write on. Now that has changed. Each desk will seat 3 students.

Sunday, June 10, 2018

God Provides

God continues to provide!

2 weeks ago, I was scheduled to take the pastor out to Imbinis, a small church out in the bush for Sabbath services. Then later that same day, I was to go pick up another pastor in Kilipaui, after he finished his meetings, so he could get ready to leave Sunday for another series in Oiru, a village about 20 km away.  So I had a weekend booked with lots of driving over our lovely roads. Thursday afternoon when I got back from town, I discovered that one of the bolts holding the shock absorber on the car, was missing and another was loose and not in good shape.  Friday, I checked through my collection of bolts and couldn't find one.  I knew that to find one in town, if I could get there, was not likely. So I asked God to provide bolts if he wanted me to do the missionary walk-a-bouts that I had scheduled.  I searched everything I had and found nothing.  Then I decided to take my ATV down to the Oil Palm office where we do Internet sometimes, about 6 miles away. I know they work on their vehicles some there and just maybe they might have something.  When I got there I asked the mechanic if he had a bolt like I needed.  He said there are some bolts in a tray over there and you can look there.  The tray had a few used bolts in it and right on top were the 2 bolts that I needed, the exact size and were in good condition. He said I could have them!  My God says He will supply ALL my needs!  I was able to finish fixing the car so I could do my missionary work.  Saturday afternoon, when I went to pick up the second pastor, I also had to pick up the body of a lady who had died that morning. The pastor had visited her Friday night, as she was distraught as there is much devil worship where she was living.  The pastor shared scripture with her and prayed with her and she was at peace.  She passed away the next morning peacefully, and I transported her body to her village when I brought the pastor back.  Sunday morning, I took the pastor and some helpers out to Oiru, another village to hold meetings for a week where our lay worker Esther has been working.  

The next week we were so busy, we were not able to get to town to buy food and fruit.  By Sabbath, we had no fruit, but after church, some members gave us some fresh fruit! So God continues to provide for us.  

I spent a good part of the week transporting health workers to remote areas so they could vaccinate the kids for tetanus and measles.  We did it at the elementary schools.  Most of them had no chairs or desks, and one had no books, paper or writing materials.  Only one had a big chalk board.  

Thank you for your continued prayers and support.  There is so much work to do here and so few to do it.

Blessings,

Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com. (for pictures)

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations


Monday, May 14, 2018

This is Andrew's widow, carrying his picture roll in a pvc pipe carrier. 

Saturday, May 12, 2018

missionary Andrew Putai

Papua New Guinea Pioneer missionary--Andrew Putai

 

Andrew was born about 1930. The exact dates here are not usually known, because calendars are rare.  In the early 1960's, he went to Musau Island to work on a coconut plantation for three years.  While there, he noticed one of the workers didn't chew beetle nut, smoke or drink.  He also always got his work done faster than the others and better.  So Andrew asked him about it, and he was invited to visit his home.  They became friends and this new friend introduced Andrew to Jesus and the gospel.  When his contract was up, and he was ready to return to his home here in West Sepik Province, he asked the local mission office to please send a missionary to Vanimo Green District (where he was from).  They sent one, and also asked him to serve as a missionary.  He served for thirteen years here in Vanimo Green as a missionary and learned to read with third grade education.  He went to several villages here, and started up small groups of believers in a district that had never heard the gospel.

An SDA pilot/pastor by the name of Colin Winch came from Australia, and asked him to go as a missionary to the Sepik River basin in the area of May River/Ama.  This area was known for cannibalism and a missionary had died there not too long before.  Andrew agreed to go, and while sitting with a group of cannibals, God opened his eyes and he saw heavenly angels standing guard around him.  By the time he left to return to his home in Waramaiyu, here in Vanimo Green; the cannibals had become church members.

In 1994, he helped build the first church in his village of Waramaiyu.  It was made from bush materials and was re-built several times over the years.  Last year he helped to build a more permanent building which was just completed before he passed away on May 3, 2018.  His many children, several of them adopted, grandchildren and great grandchildren attended his funeral.  As he was laid to rest by the church he had just help to build, heaven cried too--as rain fell on the mourners.  I was privileged to transport his body from town on a three-hour ride to his final resting place.  The women whom accompanied me, sang hymns all the

way to Waramaiyu-- some in English, some in Pidgin, some in dialect.  Heaven's presence was near. When the body was carried to its final resting place, his widow sang hymns as she waved goodbye to him, and carried his picture roll.  (He used it to share the Bible stories.)

I was privileged to know Andrew and share the Lord's Supper with him and attend his church several times.  Now, thanks to him bringing the gospel to Vanimo Green fifty-five years ago, there are seventeen churches and about a thousand members here. 

I look forward to seeing brother Andrew again on the resurrection morning; I hope you will be there so I can introduce you to one of God's pioneer missionaries!

There is a picture of Andrew on our blog site: www.lewisjungleministries.com

Gary and Toni Lewis

 

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

 

Pioneer Missionary Andrew Putai

Tuesday, May 1, 2018