Mission Bush Pilot and Nurse

After spending three years in Guyana, South America, we have now moved to Bewani, 50 Km south of Vanimo, Papua New Guinea. We have started a new humanitarian aviation ministry here. In visiting with health officials and church people here, the need for an aviation program to reach into remote villages became very apparent. We are taking health workers and medicines/vaccines, into remote village airstrips and bringing out critically ill patients to the hospital. We also fly in educational materials for schools, as well as take in Bible workers. Toni is helping with the medical end of things, while Gary takes care of the flying part. We have several local lay missionaries we sponsor and we do ground transport for patients as well. We are volunteers here to serve our God and the unreached people of Papua New Guinea. We have a great need for more people to join in this effort.

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

adventures

Adventurous Walkabout!

Our lay missionary family, Isaac and Lonna have been after us for some time to make a trip out to a village along the boarder of Indonesia.  They have family there and were requesting that we come to share some DVD pictures about creation and the end of the world prophecies.

On Monday, we finally worked it all out so we could go.  Not knowing how far it was, or how long it would take-- and they said there were lots of mountains to cross—we knew we would need to stay overnight.

Of course, many church members wanted to go with us for the adventure, but we limited it five, because of space and weight, (habits of being a pilot).

We stopped to pick up the first two ladies, and while they were loading their things a couple came up to Toni with two young babies.  The lady said, "Do you remember the lady you took to hospital that had delivered one twin and the second one couldn't come out"?  Well, here they are, both doing fine.  While we were traveling to Vanimo to take the mother to the hospital, the grandmother had asked Toni for a suggestion of name for first one. Toni suggested Joy.  The second one they named Faith, so we met Faith and Joy!   It was nice to have a happy story as we began our trip.

A few miles after starting out, we had to ford a big river that at the moment was low but still was running fast and wide and was over three feet deep.  It helps to have a snorkel on the car.  We climbed steep mountain logging roads using low gear just to get up and then low gear again to save the brakes going down the other side.  We did this over and over with very deep drop-offs on one side.  The jungle was beautiful to see, but the road was not very good.  We came to the top of a mountain, over 4,500 feet, and they were doing some major roadwork.  We had to wait an hour for them to clear a path for us to get through.  It was very steep and I wondered how we would return, especially if it should rain and become muddy.  The village of Waris is on the border and is only about 35 miles from home, but took over 2 hrs of driving to get there.  

The elected chief of the area took us around and told everyone to come see our pictures at the school at 5:30 p.m. Then they gave us an empty teacher's house to spend the night in.  We slept on the floor and there was a tank outside with some water in it.  During the night, the rats had fun running on the metal roof and keeping us awake.  We had planned to show the pictures on the grass in front to the classrooms, but about 2 hrs before we were going to start, big dark clouds moved in over the mountains signaling rain.  I asked the Lord to hold off the rain so we could show the pictures and that people would come.  It rained for about 20 minutes getting the ground wet and muddy.   So we decided to use an empty classroom, which worked out better anyway!  The rain stopped well before the people came.  God knew best!  Nobody came until about a half hour late, a man showed up and said that we couldn't have a program in this village.  We finally got him to agree it to it because w we were showing pictures.  A few kids started to show up then, and another angry man showed up and was shouting at the kids to leave and that we had to leave right away, also.  He said" this is a Catholic village and you can't have meetings here.  I reminded him that PNG is a Christian nation and has freedom of religion.  That didn't seem to help, but he didn't expect my response and didn't seem to know how to respond.  Then he started in again.  We told him we were invited there and were going to show pictures, not hold preaching services. He thought about it and then decided that the pictures were okay. Then the people became to come about an hour late.  We showed health videos, Amazing Facts videos of where the devil and sin came from (Cosmic Conflict) and also one of what the Bible says will happen in the last days (Final Events).  When we finished, we had about 70 in attendance and they asked us to please come back and share more!  We left them a very large bag and box of used clothes, and some God Pods!

We left this morning wondering what the road and river crossing would be like after the rain.  The road was okay until we got to where they were working on it.  We had to wait again for about an hour before they let empty logging trucks come down the road and then a large dozer came down to us and towed us up the mountain until we reached the top.  We would have never made it and most likely torn out our clutch. It was very steep and muddy.  When we reached the river, it was about the same level as it had been yesterday since it didn't rain on this side of the mountain.

The devil tried so many ways to stop us, but God kept intervening to get our message out and to return us safely home!

We will put some pictures on our blog site and FB.

Your prayers and donations all help to make this possible. Thank you so much.

Gary and Toni Lewis

www.lewisjungleministries.com

Donations can be sent to:

Mission Projects Inc.

P.O. Box 504

College Place WA 99324

Please include a note: PNG project

Or go to www.Missionprojectsinc.org for cc or online donations

 

 

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